Posted by on Sep 8, 2021 in Uncategorized |

endure, suffer, endure, stay, tolerate, stand ways to endure something difficult or painful. The bear normally involves strength without raising or breaking. Forced to endure a tragic loss, this often indicates more acceptance or passivity than courage or patience in the port. To suffer many insults means to remain firm or determined by trials and difficulties. Years of rejection suggest acceptance without resistance or protest. their incivility may tolerate suggests overcoming an impulse or successfully controlling something harmful or tasteless, avoiding or annoying. Refusing to tolerate such treatment, he insisted even more on the ability to endure without dissatisfaction or increase. Unable to bear teasing Although the phrase cannot stand, for some, has the feeling of a modern everyday language, it has been pointed out that such use dates back at least to Shakespeare: in Henry IV, Part II, Falstaff says: “She would always say that she cannot remain Master Shallow.” Stick only to the means “to comply with it”. By approving the contract, you agree to abide by the contractual conditions. (The word shares a root with other words like offering—as in “to do one`s commandments”—and forbidding.) The questions you ask have nothing to do with the meaning of the word “stay.” As @phenry said, the clause you cited simply requires you to comply with the company`s Terms of Use (ToS). The word on which commitment is based is not really to stay; It is – you agree that this is something you are going to do, otherwise you will be violating the treaty. Whether this involves the action or implementation of anything would be defined in the Terms of Use.

Staying may seem old-fashioned these days. The word already existed before the twelfth century, but it is now a little rare, except in some specialized uses. Even more archaic for our modern ear is “abider”, the original past party of “staying”. Today, past and past participations of “stay” are served either by “stay” or by “respected”, “respected” being the most frequent choice. . . .